Welcome to SVP Online 2016

ALLERGIES

Spring allergy symptoms often begin mid-March. Being prepared for the season can help lessen the severity of symptoms. Those with known seasonal allergies should begin their allergy medication in mid-March to prevent severe symptoms later in the season.

Seasonal allergy symptoms most commonly include itchy, watery, puffy eyes; runny, itchy nose; and sneezing.  Some patients may experience hives or other rashes or worsening eczema.  Most patients with spring allergies have symptoms through mid-June due to tree pollens; however, those with allergies to grasses may have lasting symptoms through the summer.  Fall allergies to ragweed and goldenrod will begin late August and continue until mid-November.

 

For patients with asthma, seasonal allergy flares can also trigger asthma flares.

 

If you are having problems, please call the office.

 

now accepting new patients

 

We are currently accepting new patients with some constraints on insurance availability.  Please call today to inquire!

 

Medication refills and medical forms

Please allow 72 hour notice for medication and form requests.  This gives our office adequate time to accurately process the paperwork for you.

 

 

Annual physicals

At this time, we are scheduling about three months out for annual physicals.  Please call in advance and allow plenty of time to get in for those summer physicals and sports exams.

 

Please remember that all PIAA sports physicals for the upcoming school year need to be completed after June 1st, 2015 to count for the 2015-2016 school year.

 

Driver's physicals can be completed 6 months prior to the 16th birthday, but are only valid for one year after the physical is completed.

 

 

 

Care for colds

Even during the spring months, cold viruses can still prevail.  Handwashing and covering sneezes and coughs are the best preventive measures, but inevitably most children will become sick with a cold at some point. 

Most of the time, these can be treated at home with supportive care such as rest, fluids, nasal saline, and a humidifier.  If your child develops high, persistent fevers, worsening cough, wheezing or shortness of breath, symptoms last longer than one and a half to two weeks, or you have concerns for dehydration, he or she should be seen.

 

Please remember that we do not recommend over the counter cough and cold medicines for children under six years old due to side effects in this age group.  Our office also does not recommend alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen.  Make sure you have good dosing for your child's weight and stick with whichever product works better for your child's illness.

 

Please call the office if you have any questions or concerns regarding caring for your child's cold or flu at home or if you feel he or she needs to be seen.

 

Child safety seat use

 

 

 

Digital Children

It is important for your child to have balance between the real world and the digital one. They need to develop social, cognitive, and communication skills by interacting with people as well as technology. Try to limit 'screen' time to no more than 1-2 hours a day. Limiting screen time will also encourage creative, active play and exercise!

 

 

disclaimer

The purpose of this site is to provide accurate medical information. It is not meant to take the place of routine health supervision office visits and it does not mean that we don't want you to ask questions when your child is seen. We'll try to keep the information as current as possible.

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SVP OfficeOur office

 

 

 

 

 

Susquehanna Valley Pediatrics

6 East Mountain Avenue - S. Williamsport, PA 17702

 

 

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